Leen d’Haenens, University of Nijmegen

Leen d’Haenens,
University of Nijmegen

Leen d’Haenens is associate professor at the department of communication, University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands, where she teaches European media policy, international communication, and a course on media, minorities and prejudice. She studied Romance philology and communication studies at the University of Ghent, and obtained an M.Sc. in information studies from the University of Toronto.

Her current research interests include “old” and “new” media reception by audience groups such as children and adolescents, ethnic minorities and women. She recently co-edited with Frieda Saeys Media Dynamics and Regulatory Concerns in the Digital Age, and edited Cyberidentities: Canadian and European Presence in Cyberspace.

Publications on Euromedia Topics

Media policy and regulation

Bardoel. J. & d’Haenens, L. (2005). Media moeten responsiever worden [The media must be more responsive], Christen Democratische Verkenningen: kwartaaltijdschrift van het wetenschappelijk instituut voor het CDA. (“Op zoek naar vertrouwen in de pers” [In search of trust in the press] (Special Issue)). Spring issue: 90-9.
 

Bardoel, J., d’Haenens, L. & Peeters, A. (2005). Defining distinctiveness. In search of public broadcasting performance and quality criteria. In G.F. Lowe & P. Jauert (eds.), RIPE Yearbook: Cultural Dilemmas of Public Service Broadcasting (pp. 57-77). Göteborg: Nordicom.

Bardoel, J. & d’Haenens, L. (2004a). Media meet the citizen. Beyond market mechanisms and government regulations, European Journal of Communication 19 (2): 165-94.
   

Bardoel, J. & d’Haenens, L. (2004b). Media responsibility and accountability: New conceptualizations and practices, Communications: The European Journal of Communication Research 29 (1): 5-25.
   

van Summeren, C. & d’Haenens, L. (2004). Looking for transparent and measurable performance criteria as an alternative for the membership requirement. The BNN case, Communications: The European Journal of Communication Research 29 (1): 93-112.